Planning & Estates Law Project

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How a NYC Frontline Healthcare Worker Protected Her Family during the COVID-19 Outbreak

by Nancy LarcherAugust 26, 2020

As New York City became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, the City Bar Justice Center’s (CBJC) Planning and Estates Law Project (PELP) stepped up to support our city’s dedicated frontline healthcare workers. In March 2020, with the support of outstanding pro bono collaborators, PELP launched an initiative to expand existing services to provide free remote legal assistance to our City’s frontline healthcare workers.

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What You Should Do if a Family Member is Dying

by PELP StaffMarch 23, 2020

The anxiety stemming from the impending death of a family member after a struggle with a long-term illness or as a result of an unexpected illness such as COVID-19 makes focusing on routine financial matters that much harder and challenging. It is, however, just such circumstance that should motivate action in order to streamline and simplify what is required after death.

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advanced cancer medical debt cbjc

Advanced Cancer: What Happens to My Medical Debt After I Die?

by Vivienne Duncan, Esq.December 18, 2018

Advanced cancer and medical debt A majority of New Yorkers will leave behind some amount of debt when they pass on. For those diagnosed with cancer, and especially those with advanced cancer, this may be of particular concern as they embark on medical treatment that could significantly impact their own, and their family’s, financial stability. … Continue reading Advanced Cancer: What Happens to My Medical Debt After I Die?

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aging in place cbjc_blog

Aging in Place: What Documents Do I Need and What Happens After My Death

by Marisa Guerrero and Brianna NoonanJuly 11, 2018

As we age, we find ourselves asking important questions such as: Should I have a plan in place to prepare for a health emergency? What happens if I become incapacitated? What happens after I die? The questions that accompany aging may seem daunting. That’s why the City Bar Justice Center’s Planning and Estates Law Project (PELP) has … Continue reading Aging in Place: What Documents Do I Need and What Happens After My Death

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PELP Emergency Initiative

Planning and Estates Law Project Emergency Initiative

by CBJC StaffOctober 25, 2017

The Planning and Estates Law Project of the City Bar Justice Center is a resource for New Yorkers in need. PELP provides low-income New Yorkers with free legal assistance by preparing documents, providing assistance with probating wills and administering estates, and offering guidance on related matters.

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protect your home from deed theft

Protecting Your Home from Deed Theft

by Marisa Guerrero and Brianna NoonanFebruary 10, 2017

Did you inherit your home after a family member passed away? Do you think you now own the home? Are you sure? You may think you own your home, but if you inherited the property from a deceased family member, it is possible that you are not yet the legal homeowner.

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The Importance of Updating Beneficiary Designations

by CBJC StaffAugust 30, 2016

Have you ever worked for the City of New York? The MTA? The New York City Transit Authority, New York City Housing Authority, or New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation? As an employee, you may have been eligible to pension benefits through the New York City Employees’ Retirement System (NYCERS).

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The Informant: Matters Relating to the Death Certificate – by Pamela Ehrenkranz

by CBJC StaffApril 22, 2016

Life is fleeting, but the information on a death certificate crystallizes certain information for time immemorial. Truthful reporting of the information contained in the death certificate is, therefore, critical if the record is to be true and correct.

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“We’re Here!” – Addressing Life Planning Needs of LGBT Seniors

by CBJC StaffSeptember 16, 2015

Scenario: Judy is retired and her long-term companion Mavis has been unable to work in her later years because of a disability. They have no children and live alone in a modest co-op apartment that Mavis purchased decades earlier.

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